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Texas's Isaiah Taylor celebrates with his teammates and fans after beating Oklahoma 76-63 during the of the NCAA men's college basketball game at the Frank Erwin Center in Austin, Tex., Saturday, Feb. 27, 2016. RICARDO B. BRAZZIELL/AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Men's Basketball

What’s the best college basketball job in the state of Texas? ESPN chimes in

Posted June 15th, 2017

So what’s the best college basketball job in the state of Texas?

Think about it.

It’s not a trick question.

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Don’t overthink it.

ESPN didn’t.

Despite the recent successes of Southern Methodist, or the tournament run of Texas A&M in 2016, or the the crazy winning streaks of Stephen F. Austin or the consistency of Baylor, the answer is a pretty easy guess.

Texas is the best college basketball job in the state of Texas according to the Worldwide Leader of Sports.

Despite Texas limping out of the 2016-2017 season with the worse season in decades, an 11-22 year, Texas is still the best program. The Longhorns are the only program from Texas to reach the Final Four since 2000, when T.J. Ford led them there in 2003. Only Baylor with its handful of Elite Eight runs can come close to match Texas’ resume. The Longhorns also have been the most consistent team in the state when it comes to recruiting, been to the most NCAA Tournaments since 2000 and produced two national players of the year in that period, Kevin Durant and T.J. Ford.

Here’s what ESPN has to say:

“Although Shaka Smart missed expectations last season, he makes $3 million per year, and the UT name helps him pursue five-star talent each season. Just ask Mohamed Bamba, part of a top-10 recruiting class Smart assembled for 2017-18.”

Texas joins Iowa State, Kansas, Oklahoma and West Virginia as Big 12 teams ESPN named the best in their states.

 

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